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Ways You Might Get Teeth Damage

Dental Advice | Dental Care

When we develop certain habits to improve our well-being, we are not always made aware of the problems those habits can cause our teeth. Teeth often receive a lower priority in terms of health, and some things are missed.

 

Here are some healthy practices you could be doing that might do more harm than good to your teeth:

 

BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING

While it is an excellent thing to brush your teeth regularly, you have to know that timing plays an important role when doing so. The enamel softens and becomes susceptible to abrasive wear temporarily when you consume something acidic like oranges. So, brushing your teeth (and forcefully even) might remove enamel, leaving your teeth feeling sensitive. As you get older, it will only worsen because our gums recede with age and get more root surface exposure.

 

You can take more precaution by waiting approximately 30 minutes before brushing your teeth.

 

DRINKING LEMON WATER

Drinking lemon juice helps in digestion, cleanses the body of toxins, and strengthens immunity – these are just some of its health benefits. However, lemon juice or lemon juice diluted with water is a major culprit of dental erosion.

 

You should not stop drinking lemon water, but what you can do is take extra steps to protect your teeth in the process. Using a straw helps lessen the detrimental effects of this drink to your teeth. After drinking lemon juice or lemon water, be sure to have a drink of plain, ordinary water afterward.

 

TAKING MEDICATION THAT CAUSES DRY MOUTH

You might have been diagnosed by an illness or a chronic health condition that requires taking prescribed medications. Unfortunately, there are many drugs that come with the side effect of reducing saliva flow – your oral health could suffer in such instances. Those patients who are taking medications that give them a dry mouth are at a higher risk of developing tooth decay because the saliva is not there to physically buffer acids or wash food debris away.

 

You should not stop your medication, but what you can do is try sipping water throughout the day. Saliva flow can, however, be increased with sugarless gum, mints with xylitol content, tablets, gels and sprays designed specifically for dry mouth.

 

EXERCISING WITHOUT ANY DENTAL PROTECTION

Physical activity greatly benefits our bodies in hundreds of ways. However, you must remember that when you participate in impact sports such as martial arts or hockey, your teeth become at risk for damages if not protected properly. A custom mouthguard offers a cushion around the teeth in case of a direct impact to the face.

 

So, if you do not want to see your teeth chipped or knocked out, always wear a mouthguard. Repairing such damages require a lot of work and money, so in this case, prevention is definitely better than cure.

Awesome Dental Tips That Moms Need to Know

Dental Advice | Dental Hygiene | Oral Health

There are so many reasons as to why you should keep your family’s teeth and gums as healthy as possible:

 

*Maintaining their sparkling smiles.

*Avoiding toothaches and discomfort.

*Being able to chew for good nutrition.

*Avoiding gum disease and other serious problems.

 

Don’t worry! The great news is that there are simple ways on how you can keep your family’s (and even your own) teeth and gums strong and healthy from childhood to old age! Here they are:

 

#01. It’s never too early to start. One in four young children can develop signs of tooth decay way before they even start school. By the time your kid reaches the ages of 12 to 15, you can expect that half of the children his or her age have cavities. Dental care should actually begin as soon as your child’s first tooth appears – usually around six months after birth. When dealing with babies, their teeth can be wiped clean with a damp cloth or a very soft brush. When your child turns two years old, then you can let him or her have a turn brushing for themselves; just be sure to still follow up and supervise them.

 

#02. Seal off any trouble. Permanent molars come in when your child turns six years old. Thin protective coatings may be applied to the chewing surfaces of your child’s back teeth to prevent tooth decay in the pits and fissures. Sealants are known for reducing caries significantly. For more questions about this dental tip, do not hesitate to set up an appointment with one of our dentists today!

 

#03. Use the right amount of fluoride. Fluoride is known for strengthening enamel, making it less likely to decay. Some people even drink fluoridated water. There are also kinds of toothpaste and mouthwash that contain fluoride. Just be careful, though – you do not want to use too much fluoride! It should be used sparingly in young children – not more than a pea-sized dab on their toothbrushes. Too much fluoride can cause white spots on the teeth – you do not want that either. It is a rare occurrence though that we actually see this. As such, this can be an important additive to tooth care to prevent the other end of the spectrum of soft spots or decay which we see routinely. Happy medium!

 

#04. Brush teeth twice a day and floss daily. Tooth decay and gum disease continue to be big problems and not just for older people! Three-quarters of teenagers, according to a study, have gums that bleed.

 

#05. Block blows to the teeth. Sports and other recreational activities are great for building healthy bodies, but they can also pose a great threat to the teeth. Most school teams require kids nowadays to wear mouth guards. However, unsupervised recreational activities such as rollerblading and skateboarding can still result in injuries. Have one of our dentists create a custom-fitted mouth guard for your kids.

 

These are just some of the great dental tips that moms should know! For more expert dental advice, do not hesitate to give us a call today and set up an appointment with one of our trusted dentists!

Deep Dental Cleaning/ Dental Hygiene and Its Benefits

Dental Advice | Dental Hygiene

Most of us are familiar with the semi-annual professional cleanings of our teeth, right? It is a routine procedure that is covered by most dental insurance, and they help us keep our teeth clean and healthy. Some people, however, tend to neglect their teeth cleanings or prophylaxis, or some have more serious issues with their oral health. They can benefit from a deep cleaning of their teeth. This is routinely performed within our office as part of your cleaning by our registered dental hygienists who are trained to do so as necessary. The depth of the cleaning is necessitated by the depth of pocketing around the tooth. If bacteria have access to an area then that area needs to be addressed even if you don’t see it.

 

Deep Cleaning vs. Surface Polishing (Prophylaxis)

Deep cleaning, also known as Scaling and Root Planing, is a therapeutic procedure essential to heading off periodontal disease. In addition to cleaning the teeth, the dentist or registered hygienist will use scalers, probes and other tools for cleaning the area below the gum line. Depending on the extent of the cleaning and patient sensitivity, the provider might opt to numb the area to be cleaned with the use of local anesthetic to ensure comfort.

 

Periodontal disease occurs when plaque, calculus, and stain on the crown and root surfaces of the teeth start to cause inflammation of the gums. Rough surfaces harbour bacteria. If this is left untreated, it can lead to serious damage to the bones and soft tissue that the teeth rely on for integrity and support. If left untreated for too long, the end result is tooth loss. This is often initially observed as ‘receding gums’ – the gum tissue pulls away and detaches from the teeth. This is also the time when periodontal pockets form. This alteration to the foundation is also created with the presence of disruptive force applications. Bacterial invasion creates mobility and mobility allows bacterial invasion. These two combatants must be kept in check.

 

Scaling and root planning gives the gums a healthier environment in which they can readapt and attach to the normal teeth surfaces.

 

WHY SHOULD YOU GET DENTAL HYGIENE/A DEEP CLEANING?

These are some of the most important benefits you can get from a deep cleaning:

 

PREVENTION OF GUM DISEASE

Deep dental cleanings help discourage diseases that result from a proliferation of bacteria. Removing all calculus, plaque and tartar also mean that infections will no longer easily form.

 

IMPROVEMENT OF OVERALL HEALTH

There have been many studies that have proved the connection between one’s oral and overall health. It has also been shown that the root diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and stroke are often found in one’s oral health. Deep dental cleaning can be your ally in preventing medical conditions that are linked to oral issues. The mouth is the portal of entry. In addition, regular dental checkups and deep cleaning procedures can help you diagnose life-threatening diseases earlier.

 

PREVENTION OF TOOTH LOSS

The most common cause of gum diseases is the buildup of plaque, and gum disease is known to be the major cause of tooth loss. Since deep cleaning includes removing the plaque from your teeth and gums, it helps prevent from having loose teeth or worse, tooth loss.

 

BRIGHTENING OF SMILES

Sparkling white smiles is what all of us want, right? We all know how important it is to have a bright smile for self-confidence, but it is not that easy to maintain white teeth for various reasons – drinking coffee and smoking. This is why you should consider having deep cleaning on a regular basis.

 

Setup an appointment with one of the dentists and dental hygienists at Acadia Dental for dental hygiene/ a deep cleaning procedure. Trust us, it is worth it!

Can Eating Disorders Affect One’s Oral Health?

Dental Advice | Oral Health

Eating disorders know no age, gender, or a specific type of person. While female teenagers and women most commonly suffer from diseases like anorexia, bulimia and compulsive overeating, they can still affect anyone. Such disorders can have many negative impacts on someone’s mental and physical health. Acadia Dental knows that these health issues can also have a big impact on one’s oral health.

 

The effects can be dire. A disorder does not need to include vomiting for it to be bad for your teeth and gums. Heavily restrictive diets can extremely be unhealthy for one’s oral care as well. According to the National Eating Disorders Association, up to 89% of bulimia patients display signs of early tooth erosion. Other studies have shown similar findings with patients who have extremely restrictive diets.

 

One of the reasons why some of these disorders are so harmful is due to the loss of proper nutrition which causes gums and other soft tissues to bleed more easily. Saliva production might also be affected, causing a sufferer to have a chronic dry mouth.

 

If a patient regurgitates on a constant basis (this is also known as purging), he or she stands a greater chance of harming the teeth’s enamel due to the stomach acid. Teeth can also change in size, colour, and length, leaving them brittle. This now makes regular eating as well as one’s everyday life extremely difficult.

 

Here are some of the signs you may notice with someone who has an eating disorder:

*Teeth can become weak and translucent

*Lesions on the surface of the teeth within six months of the onset of the disorder

*Increased sensitivity to the temperature of food and liquid

*Dry mouth or enlarged salivary glands

*Exposed pulp and possible pulp death

*Sudden pain in random areas of the mouth

*Tooth decay

 

HOW ACADIA DENTAL CAN HELP

Regular dental visits can be helpful in diagnosing and preventing eating disorders from worsening. According to the Institute for Dental Research, 28% of bulimia cases were diagnosed initially during a dental examination. A patient might not even realize that what he or she is doing is a problem. We will guide the patients and provide the help that they need.

 

Our professional dental staff at Acadia Dental will be able to tell if a patient has recently started purging or if they have been doing so for years, as they can view the damage that has been done to the teeth. They will also be looking for tooth decay, enamel erosion, abnormal jaw alignment, chronic sore throat, mouth sores, and cracked lips, among others.

 

If you or someone you know is being affected by an eating disorder, it is important to get help as soon as possible. These eating disorders can be life-threatening if not treated properly. These situations should be treated with care, especially when it involves confronting a loved one. Remember that these issues are not as simple as they seem, so make sure to bring up the topic in a nonjudgmental way. This could make the difference between them seeking help and continuing on a destructive road.

Dental Checkups: How Important Are They?

Dental Advice | Dental Hygiene

You might not be so psyched to visit your dentist every six months, like many people, but it is one of the most important appointments you must keep. One of the major concerns facing dental professionals and patients is that majority of us do not visit the dentist on a regular basis. In fact, only more than a quarter of adults visit their dentists when they have a problem. Thus, the irregularity and infrequency of dental checkups are actually causing a huge number of problems for both dental professionals and patients.

 

If you find yourself wondering what the whole point of having regular dental checkups is, then we have some things for you to think about.

 

How Often Should You Have Dental Checkups

Both children and adults should visit their dentists regularly, as often as recommended. For patients who have certain medical conditions, dental professionals might want to see you more often. It is important to remember that there are certain types of medication that can impact our oral health, too.

 

Why Regular Dental Checkups are Essential

This is a common problem for most people – we tend to ignore our oral health. We often let problems develop before we actually consult a dentist. There are several issues this creates, but we have listed the two most common problems that are left unchecked:

 

Bleeding Gums

Bleeding gums mean inflamed gums. There is the presence of a challenger to create this inflammation or a susceptibility that has arisen to tip the scale of a regular challenge. However, if you visit the dentist regularly helps you ensure that your gum health is properly maintained to tip the scale in your favour. Remember, early treatment still prevents serious problems from developing. The ongoing onslaught of challengers ultimately results in destruction.

 

Tooth Pain

Pain or sensitivity are simply the response we get from a tooth when faced with a challenge. It doesn’t necessarily mean there is damage just that the natural barrier integrity is being tested by a challenger. However when a challenger is left unchecked damage can result. Pain is not a good indicator simply because it comes at different levels of onslaught and invasion for different people. Once a cavity has reached that stage where it causes pain then root canal treatment or an extensive filling is more likely to be performed as it may be that it has been infiltrated closer to the nerve within the pulp chamber. Regular dental visits help ensure that the beginnings of destruction can be identified and treated. Additional brushing routines are also created if bacteria is the challenger or perhaps a guard or muscular treatment pursued if the challenger is more force related. Ultimately your dentist wants to help you prevent damage from occurring and not just go along and help pick up the pieces as damage results.

 

THE BOTTOM LINE

Overall dental checkups will significantly decrease the potential for all oral health problems becoming serious. Having dental checkups is also more cost-effective as compared to paying for expensive major dental procedures such as tooth replacements, gum repair, and crowns, among others.

 

If you are looking for a dentist whom you can entrust your teeth and gums with, then you have come to the right place! Contact us today for an appointment with one of our dentists here at Acadia Dental!

Basic Dental Implant Terms You Should Know

Dental Implants

If you are in need of a dental implant but you do not know exactly what to expect during the procedure, then this article is for you. Your dentist might use terms that sound like they are speaking another language, and we want to help you familiarize yourself. Here are some definitions that can help you decode dental speak so that you can understand exactly what goes on during a dental implant procedure:

 

Implant

The implant itself is the fixture part that is physically implanted into bone. Some people refer to this as a post, however, posts are different as they are utilized within tooth canals following root canal therapy to give internal structure to build upon. As such an implant acts as a new tooth root or foundational pillar, while a post is incorporated into an existing tooth root.

 

Implant Abutment

This is a middle piece connector that dentists build into or attach to the top of a dental implant. It emerges from the implant to above the gums. It engages the internal connection threads of the implant. This serves as the attachment piece to shape healing of the gum tissue with a healing abutment and can be substituted for a temporary or final connection abutment. This piece, in turn, supports a crown, bridge, or the replacement tooth and it keeps it firmly in place as a natural tooth does for traditional restorations.

 

Abutment Teeth

These are still existing natural teeth that support a partial denture or a bridge. The bridge is attached to the abutment tooth during an inlay/onlay or full crown preparation. For partial dentures, rests or clasps are usually used to support the denture on the abutment tooth. Dentists utilize either natural teeth as abutments or implant abutments to build upon.

 

Crown

A crown is a new external surface for a single tooth, and it can also be referred to as a cap. They can be linked together to span across spaces as does a bridge over water utilizing abutments as supports. If you have broken or lost a tooth due to decay, infection, injury, or other health problems, your dentist can often fit your mouth with a crown or bridge in order to replace the damaged or missing tooth or tooth structure. Crowns are typically fitted over the top of existing teeth, fortifying and replacing the missing structure, or they can also be attached to the abutment of a dental implant or also spanned across implants.

 

Dentures

These are traditional options that can replace missing teeth, but there are many patients that do not have the same success with dentures as they do with dental implants. There are dentures that can be removed daily for cleaning and storage purposes, while others are attached permanently to the mouth. Partial dentures can replace at least one tooth, but not the arch. These partial dentures can shift in your mouth and can cause discomfort, making it more difficult to speak, eat and smile. Partial dentures or complete dentures can utilize abutments to stabilize them. These abutments can again be natural teeth when available or implants or may use a combination.

 

Titanium

Most dental implants nowadays are made of titanium. This metal has a lot of advantages. Very few people have proven allergic to titanium, so it is rare for a patient to have a negative reaction to this material. It is lightweight, but very strong, thus reducing the weight on the bone or within the mouth. It also has a high affinity to oxygen, making it form a thin oxide layer when placed in the body. Titanium can ossify with the bone, which means that it can produce a stronger result that can last for many years. Titanium is also commonly utilized for the connecting abutment.

 

Zirconia

Zirconia is considered a fortified ceramic. It has become a widely utilized material in dentistry due to being a strong readily white option. A white base can offer more esthetic options when trying to make replacement structure look more natural. Metallic colors often require masking layers to give a natural appearance when esthetics is of importance so white bases can allow for more translucent natural covers. This material is commonly utilized now in crowns and bridges, supporting abutments in esthetic zones, and has even been implanted as the implant fixture itself although has limitations.

 

If you have other questions or concerns about dental implants, feel free to reach out to the dental experts and professionals here at Acadia Dental. We hope to hear from you soon!

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